Sabrina's Basic Fashion Doll Gloves, page 1 of 2

 

 

Sabrina Summers of DollCouture would like to share her pattern and sewing tips with you.

 

 

Preparing Your Fabric

Step 1.  Recommended fabrics: stretch tulle, tricot, lightweight knits.

a) Cut a rectangle of fabric about 6" wide and 4" long. Make sure all sides are even.

b) Using a clear plastic ruler and chalk (avoid the waxy kind), mark down 1/4" from the edge,

c) Fold on the line, pin, baste in place.  This will become the hem at upper edge of each glove.

d) If you do not want to do this extra work, you can simply proceed to Step 2c and when finishing your gloves simply turn in 1/4" at the fold line and tack in place.  However, if you do follow Step 1, when cutting the pattern omit the 1/4" hem.


Step 2.  Get Ready To Sew

Recommended for sewing:  Ballpoint needle for knits, size 9 or 11 (depends on thickness or fineness of fabric); poly/cotton thread.

a) Using a small zigzag stitch with a small-medium length (I use a 2-3 on the dial of my machine) stitch the hem in place.

b) Remove basting stitches.

c) Lay fabric on flat surface.  Make sure the right side faces up towards you.

d) Fold both sides towards center.  Pin in place.  Your fabric will now have the inside hem facing up towards you.


Step 3.  Tracing the Pattern and Basting to Fabric

Recommendation: Use a single piece of a plain white napkin to trace and baste onto the fabric.  Tissue paper is sometimes very hard to remove after sewing with tiny stitches.  The napkin will come right off with little paper remaining in the seams.

a) Place a single sheet of a white paper napkin over the pattern and lightly trace the cutting and sewing lines.  Do this for left and right glove.

b) pin and baste the left and right glove pattern pieces on the respective folds of fabric.  Make sure to place edge of glove against the sewn edge.

c) Using the same size and length of zigzag stitch follow the outline from fold, over curve of hand.  when reaching the small area between the hand and he thumb make one backstitch then go forward and make another back stitch.  This will reinforce the area.

d) Continue stitching down the arm of the glove.  Backstitch at end to secure.  Remove paper.

e) If your fabric is very stretch, you may want to run a second row of stitches just above and inside the seam to reinforce and prevent tearing.

f) Trim seam, clip at thumb and hand area.


Step 4.  Turning the glove

There are several ways to turn the glove right side out:

      Insert a drinking straw into the glove, right to the end; place a smooth rod (for instance, the straight end of a plastic crochet hook) on the end of the glove which is over the hole in the straw, and roll the glove up over the rod.  Ease out the thumb carefully with a very narrow smooth rod, or with a pin.

      OR make two overcast stitches on the glove, then ease the needle through the inside until it comes out at the end of the glove.  Carefully pull on the thread to turn the glove to the right side.  Ease the thumb out with a small crochet hook, or with a pin.

     OR sew a piece of fine string placing it on the right side of the fabric at the top of the glove.  The string would be inside while you sew the glove on the wrong side.  then you pull on the string to quickly turn the glove to the right side; ease the thumb out with a small crochet hook.  Ease the thumb out with a small crochet hook, or with a pin.

Optional:  Once the gloves are turned you can put one or two tiny overcast stitches near the thumb to reinforce that area.


NOTE FROM PERESTROIKA:  USE A STABILIZER UNDER KNIT AND STRETCHY FABRICS WHEN YOU SEW;  SEE THE  PRIMER FOR SEWING WITH KNITS  FILE.  AN OPTION TO THE NAPKIN PAPER IS THE CLEAR WASH-AWAY STABILIZER.

MAKE THE GLOVES SHORTER OR LONGER TO SUIT YOUR DOLL'S OUTFIT.